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of the muslim brotherhood and other islamists rallied behind mohamed morsi. nbc's jim maceda is in cairo with the latest on that. >> hi, craig. supporters really needed a massive turnout today at their rally to stem the momentum of the opposition, which has seen hundreds of thousands of real mix of secular, moderate, leftist, liberal, christian and other minority egyptians who have been filling up tahrir square over the past week and which tonight, by the way, continues its ten-city occupation of the square. today in the end belonged to morsi supporters. their show of support was big, at least in the tens of thousands, perhaps 100,000 or more outside cairo university and it really had the feel of a political rally. there were people waving flags, carrying banners and chanting pro-morsi sloegers. there were some clashes reported, not in cairo, but in the north in alexandria between pro and anti-morsi groups. overall, however, the day was peaceful. that's because the muslim brotherhood is much more focused on politics than on protests. it wants to see as quickly as possible the ratificatio
have broken out between supporters and supporters of morsi after he granted himself sweeping powers and passed a draft constitution that owe ponents say fails to protect justice and human rights kerry kennedy. thanks for joining the program. against the backdrop of syria and lesser extent egypt in terms of combatting grave human rights abuses around the world i wonder what you make of the american appetite as it stands given where we've been on certain issues after bosnia, rwanda, there was a sense we would not let these things go without attention and resources and you look at what's happening in syria and it's a complicated issue to be sure but is there an american outcry to the extent that we would have expected to have one, given where we've been on human rights abuses in previous eras? >> i think there is a tremendous amount of compassion and concern by ordinary americans. i hate to say this on this tv show, but you're actually covering those issues and a lot of places just aren't to the extent they used to. i think that's part of the problem. but one example of that is right n
. i'm chris hayes. a draft of egypt's new constitution will be delivered to president mohamed morsi today. private first class bradley manning accused of leaking classified documents to wikileaks will return to court in fort meade maryland. right now i'm joined by richard a renberg. allen frumin who retired as parliamentarian of the u.s. senate last year. this is his first interview since then. akil amar and sterling professor of law at yale law school. and msnbc contributor, victoria defrancesco soto. great to have you all here. all right. if president obama wants to get anything done in his second term, democrats in the senate will have to overcome one major obstacle, the filibuster. since democrats took control of both chambers of congress in 2007, republicans have used the filibuster as a bludgeon against them to pass basic legislation. the senate bills that actually passed has dropped from just over 25% to a record low of 2.8% this year. the rate held steady at 10% through the clinton and bush years and then plummeted when democrats took control of congress in 2007. that is due
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3